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This is an old technical article I wrote about the game of life, with a humor that only techies may enjoy. It is a risky publish!

This is an old technical article I wrote, with a humor that only techies may enjoy. It is a risky publish!

Last January, Games Online Distribution (GOD) Global Enterprises released the latest version of its globally renowned video game Life20 2.0. Almost immediately the global media spewed a stampede of reviews from gaming critics most of which were negative with unprecedented temper.

Critics urge the players to stay with version 1.9 if they can as the upgrade is irreversible and it is not backward compatible. Once you are on Life20 2.0, there is no going back. The lack of backward compatibility was intentionally designed by the original architect Jesus DiMaria (not to be confused with Argentine soccer player, Angel Di Maria).

Life20 gamers are mostly life timers. It is by far the most diverse and comprehensive set of gaming features packed into a single game. The possibilities are unlimited. Whether you are into hockey, tennis, gambling, or speed racing, it offers you all the entertainment to last for eternity. Life20 offers gamers the possibility to switch between games and to transfer their scores. They can play with multiple gamers simultaneously though not everyone has the skills for it.

Some Life20 hard core gamers, the fanatics of the game, are still running on version 1 or even the Beta Copies. They argue that although newer versions offer enhanced futures and many more gaming options, the purity of the game has been lost since version 1.5. Nevertheless, the common consensus is that version 1.9 was pretty much close to perfect. Gamers are furious that the Company’s VP of Operations, Peter MiRoca, has rushed a new version to market as greedy shareholders were pushing for even greater returns.

Life20 1.9 was perfect. Gamers did not find any downsides to it except for a minority hardcore fans who argued it was too easy to advance levels and there were too many hidden shortcuts in the game. But easy is what the new generation of gamers wants. Variety is the spice of life20, so what is wrong with easy. Gamer could switch between games almost instantly. If they did not like winter games, they could skip to summer and back and forth. There was no limit to the size of mansions and accumulation of gold blocks (old timers know them as cookies). Weed was offered for almost free and drinking age did not exist in most aspects of the game. Gamers could basically create their own games within the game. Young gamers say this level of sophistication was revolutionary.

The major issue with Life20 2.0, is an inherent virus that seems to transmit from machine to machine as gamers accept challenges on the cloud. The whole point of the game is to find challengers to play with, gamers claim. Playing alone is not a game at all and is not what the founder intended for it. The virus can further hide itself until it has acquired at least one victim, hence the game can eventually kill itself and destroy the machine (Humana running on Espiritu /Operativo System).

Gamers believe that this is an intentional revenue grab to sell new machines and new games to the masses. Papito Francois, the new chief architect urges everyone that the virus was not an intentional part of the game but the doing of a disgruntled employee who did not get his promotion. Papito blamed Juda Isaac for the doing but Juda is long gone, and the story cannot be confirmed. The gamers muse at this coincidence and they not buying it.

The company simply does not have the resources to fix the problem fast enough as billions of gamers have already rushed into version 2.0. They are asking gamers to stop playing until the fix is available and, in most part, they are complying with the request. The company is not commenting on weather a software fix is possible without the need to upgrade the Humana machine which is quite costly. The hardcore fanatics seem to have a field day with the situation, not realizing that the virus can penetrate the machine’s OS.

Startup gaming company, Baha International SA, claims to have a new operating system that can run on the existing Humana machine without alteration. They claim that the Life20 has already been tested on their B/OS 1.77 and it works just fine inhibiting the virus from spreading. There are two major challenges with this solution. First is that GOD claims their patent still holds on Humana and second is that implementing the new OS is not automatic and requires gamers to follow many steps and to undergo extensive training.

For the time being, enjoy all that Life20 version 1.9 has to offer if you have not upgraded yet.

Chai Nuevaera, independent journalist

March 25, 2020

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